Going slow isn't necessarily the best route to ditching cigarettes. Patrik Stollarz /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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To Quit Smoking, It's Best To Go Cold Turkey

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E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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Smokers More Likely To Quit If Their Own Cash Is On The Line

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In Pregnancy, What's Worse? Cigarettes Or The Nicotine Patch?

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