The parts of the brain known to help process fear and negative emotion are hyperactive when someone with math anxiety confronts a tricky problem, scientists say. iStockphoto hide caption

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How Likely Is It, Really, That Your Athletic Kid Will Turn Pro?
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Parents of children who are extremely finicky may find it useful to seek help, psychologists say, because some kids won't outgrow the behavior on their own. But don't make the table a battlefield. Chad Springer/Corbis hide caption

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Could Your Child's Picky Eating Be A Sign Of Depression?
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Sure, it's cute. But that voice! Lennart Tange/flickr hide caption

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Enough With Baby Talk; Infants Learn From Lemur Screeches, Too
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