The 80-year-old Tsukiji Fish Market currently sits on some of the most valuable land in Tokyo, with easy access to wholesalers, retailers and tourists. Naomi Gingold for NPR hide caption

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For Tokyo's Famed Fish Market, A Dreaded Death And A Hopeful Rebirth
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It's a basement bar in Tokyo, but patrons of Little Texas say the place feels like it's part of the Lone Star State. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Finding A Little Texas ... In The Heart Of Tokyo
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Demonstrators rally against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's controversial security bills in front of the National Diet in Tokyo in September. The bills, which passed, will allow Japan to send its troops overseas for the first time since World War II. However, the likelihood of Japanese involvement in a foreign war appears quite small. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japan Can Now Send Its Military Abroad, But Will It?
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The entrance to the main building of Japan's iconic Hotel Okura in Tokyo. An outcry from architectural preservationists couldn't stop the demolition to make way for a high-rise tower. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Workers Are Tearing Down Tokyo's Hotel Okura, And History's Going With It
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Shoppers view and take photographs of humanoid robot "Chihira" at the information reception desk of Mitsukoshi department store in Tokyo. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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She's Almost Real: The New Humanoid On Customer Service Duty In Tokyo
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Yae and Ren were married during Tokyo's Rainbow Pride Weekend in April. One Tokyo ward, or neighborhood, has recognized same-sex marriages, becoming the first place in Japan — or anywhere in East Asia — to do so. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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The First Place In East Asia To Welcome Same-Sex Marriage
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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe
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Photos of Luanda, Angola, tell a tale of two cities: sprawling poor neighborhoods and a glitzy waterfront. Saul Loeb/Getty Images; Michael Gottschalk/Getty Images hide caption

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Tokyo will host the 2020 Summer Games, IOC officials said Saturday. In Tokyo, five-time Paralympian Wakako Tsuchida, left, and former Olympic athletes Hiromi Miyake, center, and Yoshiyuki Miyake cheer the news. Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images hide caption

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