E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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Will this maker of snus, an alternative to cigarettes, be allowed to claim it is less harmful? Swedish Match hide caption

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Vapor from an e-cigarette obscures the user's face in a London coffee bar. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

E-Cigarettes Can Churn Out High Levels Of Formaldehyde

Unexpectedly high levels of the cancer-causing chemical were found in an analysis of the vapor from e-cigarettes, researchers say.

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Tobacco giant Reynolds American is buying Lorillard and acquiring Newport, a popular menthol cigarette. In a shrinking market, Newport is one of the few U.S. brands gaining market share. It is particularly popular among African-American smokers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman tries electronic cigarettes at a store in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Vaporizer pens look like the e-cigarettes that dispense nicotine. But these devices are optimized for a potent marijuana resin with high concentrations of THC. Courtesy of Grenco Science hide caption

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Some employees say e-cigarettes increase their productivity and help them steer clear of tobacco. But health regulators are looking into possible risks to e-cig users — and to co-workers. iStockphoto hide caption

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