Three Somali-American men accused of plotting to join the Islamic State are on trial in Minneapolis. Fadumo Hussein (left) is the stepsister who reared one of the defendants, Guled Omar. She calls him her son and says, "we are not terrorists." Sadik Warfa (right) is a community leader in Minneapolis. Dina Temple-Raston/NPR hide caption

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Police officers watch as a demonstrator holds a sign in front of a north Minneapolis police precinct during a protest in response to Sunday's shooting of Jamar Clark by police officers in Minneapolis. Craig Lassig /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Members of the Minneapolis Somali community waited in May to enter the U.S. Courthouse where a federal judge ordered four Minnesota men, accused of trying to travel to Syria to join ISIS, to be held pending trial. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Minneapolis Unveiling Plan To Counter Recruiting By ISIS
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After Waterway Closure, Minneapolis Sees An End To River Shipping
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Somali-American youths play basketball before the start of a September 2013 solidarity rally by the Minneapolis Somali community to denounce al-Shabab's attack of a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Less than a decade after groups of teens from Minneapolis emigrated to Somalia to join the terrorist group, more have been recruited to join the self-declared Islamic State in Syria. Eric Miller/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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For Somalis In Minneapolis, Jihadi Recruiting Is A Recurring Nightmare
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St. Paul-Minneapolis Archbishop John Nienstedt speaks at his office in St. Paul, Minn., in a photo taken in July. Nienstedt announced Friday that the archdiocese was filing for bankruptcy following more than a dozen claims from alleged sexual abuse victims. Craig Lassig/AP hide caption

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Minneapolis Police Chief Janee Harteau and former Mayor R.T. Rybak in May 2013. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Minneapolis Police Make An Effort To Hire More Minority Officers
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