A Sig Sauer MCX rifle can be seen on display at the top left of this photo as NRA gun enthusiasts view the Sig Sauer display at the National Rifle Association's annual meetings & exhibits show in Louisville, Ky., in May. John Sommers II/Reuters hide caption

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Anti-gun groups and state officials joined New Yorkers Against Gun Violence to mark the sixth month anniversary of the Newtown massacre on the steps of New York City Hall in 2013. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Gun Stocks Up, But Activists Move To Expand Anti-Investment Push

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Closing loopholes in background checks for gun purchases would reduce the risk of death and injury, doctors' and attorneys' groups say. Alexa Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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In 2010, Omar Thornton killed eight colleagues in Manchester, Conn., before killing himself. Private employers used to create their own rules about guns on their property. But over the past five years, many states have adopted laws that allow employees to keep firearms in their vehicles at work. Douglas Healey/Getty Images hide caption

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Do Guns On The Premises Make Workplaces Safer?

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The Armatix smart gun is implanted with an electronic chip that allows it to be fired only if the shooter is wearing a watch that communicates with it through a radio signal. It is not sold in the U.S. Michael Dalder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A New Jersey Law That's Kept Smart Guns Off Shelves Nationwide

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Flags fly at half-staff Tuesday after the deadly shootings at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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