Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images

Kara Dethlefsen, an active-duty Marine, attends the monthly food pantry at the Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base near San Diego. Her husband is also a Marine. She says the food assistance is helping them get ready for his transition back to civilian life. The couple has a 4-month-old daughter. Dorian Merina/KPCC hide caption

toggle caption
Dorian Merina/KPCC

Volunteers gather bags of groceries for people seeking assistance at a food pantry in Concord, Mass. Many groups that help low-income families get food aid say they've seen an alarming drop recently in the number of immigrants applying for help. Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yoon S. Byun/Boston Globe/Getty Images

Deportation Fears Prompt Immigrants To Cancel Food Stamps

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521823480/521823481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Snap surged Thursday in its first day of trading, with shares jumping more than 40 percent from Wednesday's IPO pricing. Among the day's big winners was a small Silicon Valley high school. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A sign sits on a sidewalk outside the Interfaith Food Pantry at Emmanuel Baptist Church in February in Albany, N.Y. Congress may be under more pressure than usual to cut safety net spending — health care, housing assistance, welfare and food aid — to help pay for Trump's tax cut plans. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Groll/AP

Anti-Poverty Advocates Brace For How Trump Will Fill In Policy Blanks

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502069013/502457015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Joel McKinney stands beside a hydroponic tower that is part of his farm outside the Five Loaves and Two Fishes Food Bank. Roxy Todd/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Roxy Todd/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In Coal Country, Farmers Get Creative To Bridge The Fresh Produce Gap

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498428912/498442094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Angela Dominguez works for the Income Support Division in Portales, N.M. She's a whistleblower who spoke out about the practice of changing food stamps applications. Marisa DeMarco/KUNM hide caption

toggle caption
Marisa DeMarco/KUNM

New Mexico Defrauds The Poor Out Of Food Stamps, Whistleblowers Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484778728/484832538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nearly one-third of households on SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, still have to visit a food pantry to keep themselves fed, according to USDA data. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

On Friday, Terry Work stands outside a store that accepts food stamps in Bon Aqua, Tenn. Work's 27-year-old deaf son recently was denied disability payments, meaning he is considered able-bodied. Now he stands to lose his food stamps, even though he has trouble keeping a job because of his deafness, she says. Work requirements began kicking in this month for a million SNAP benefit recipients. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Humphrey/AP

The federal food stamps program is working to make sure low-income Americans are getting enough calories, but those calories are less nutritious than what everyone else eats, research finds. The USDA is funding programs to try to bridge that gap, such as initiatives that allow food stamp recipients to use their benefits at farmers markets. Allen Breed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Allen Breed/AP

A new budget plan that calls for turning food stamps into a block grant program for states could affect stores that accept food stamps through an Electronic Benefits Transfer, or EBT, system like this one in Memphis. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Both Parties Agree The Food Stamp Program Needs To Change. But How?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394149979/394216935" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript