Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky
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In 2006, a bulldozer sits ready for work at Peabody Energy's Gateway Coal Mine near Coulterville, Ill. Peabody is the latest coal company to declare bankruptcy. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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March 25: Bankruptcies Fuel Uncertainty In Coal Communities
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Oregon's large power utilities and environmental advocates have backed new legislation that phases out their use of coal. Here, a coal plant in Boardman, Ore., is seen in a 2014 file photo. Nigel Duara/AP hide caption

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Reclaimed land that was once mined for coal in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. When coal companies declare bankruptcy, funding for land reclamation becomes a question Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy hide caption

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When Coal Companies Fail, Who Pays For The Cleanup?
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The coal plant in Shamokin Dam, Pa., is a local landmark that delivered electricity to this region for more than six decades. It closed in 2014. Next to it, a brand new natural gas power plant is under construction. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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From The Ashes Of Some Coal Plants, New Energy Rises
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The federal government will stop issuing new coal leases on some 570 million acres of federal land, under a new plan being released Friday. In this photo from 2013, coal is loaded onto a truck at a mine built on federally controlled land in Montana. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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A coal miner stands in the Dotiki mine, operated by Alliance Coal, in Webster County, Ky. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

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In Kentucky, The Coal Habit Is Hard To Break
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A coal mound stands outside a Kentucky Utilities Co. station. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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India To U.S.: Cut Back On Your Consumption!
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New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, pictured during a speech last year, says Peabody Energy misled investors when it insisted it couldn't predict the impact of climate change regulation. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Luliang is in recession, but developers continue to build apartment blocks even though demand for real estate is drying up. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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A 'Sense Of Crisis' Now In A Chinese Boomtown Gone Bust
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Kevin Murphy says he is proud of what he and the other workers do at the Rosebud mine, including digging the coal and reclaiming the land afterward. Amy Martin/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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New EPA Rules Motivate Montana To Look Beyond Coal
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President Obama's environmental plan won't be so hard for states that have moved to cut emissions. But for others it will be more difficult. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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For Some States, New Emissions Rules Will Force A Power Shift
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