Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

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NET Power has built carbon capture technology into its power plant outside Houston, which will generate electricity by burning natural gas. The demonstration project should be fully operational later this year, according to NET Power. Courtesy of NET Power hide caption

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Courtesy of NET Power

Natural Gas Plant Makes A Play For Coal's Market, Using 'Clean' Technology

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At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

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Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

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The Navajo Generating Station located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, near Page, Ariz. Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project hide caption

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Amber Brown/Courtesy of Salt River Project

Navajo Workers At Coal-Fired Power Plant Brace For Its Closing

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Rick Moore, a dairy farmer in Canton, N.Y., has a solar thermal array to heat water he uses to spray down milking equipment. David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio

As Obama Clean Power Plan Fades, States Craft Strategies To Move Beyond It

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President-elect Donald Trump's promises to bring back miner jobs and open mines appealed to many voters in coal country. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Across the Ohio River from Powhatan Transportation Center — owned by Murray Energy — is a power plant that services mines in West Virginia. Jessica Cheung/NPR hide caption

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Jessica Cheung/NPR

In Ohio Coal Country, Job Prospects Lie With Neither Coal Nor Trump's Promises

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The Cardinal Power Station is a coal-fired energy plant in Brilliant, Ohio. The Obama administration's Clean Power Plan requires a 32 percent cut in carbon emissions from power plants by 2030. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Appeals Court Hears Challenge To Obama Power-Plant Emissions Rule

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Former coal miners are trained as linesmen in a program co-sponsored by the Hazard Community and Technical College and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program in Hazard, Ky. EKCEP Inc. hide caption

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EKCEP Inc.

Eastern Kentucky Tries To Keep Former Coal Miners From Leaving

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Herman "Dub" Tolbert, shown inside an American Legion post in Bokoshe, Okla., says the community is left exposed and he's determined to make regulators listen. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Communities Uneasy As Utilities Look For Places To Store Coal Ash

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Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky

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