The Cardinal Power Station is a coal-fired energy plant in Brilliant, Ohio. The Obama administration's Clean Power Plan requires a 32 percent cut in carbon emissions from power plants by 2030. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Appeals Court Hears Challenge To Obama Power-Plant Emissions Rule

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Former coal miners are trained as linesmen in a program co-sponsored by the Hazard Community and Technical College and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program in Hazard, Ky. EKCEP Inc. hide caption

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EKCEP Inc.

Eastern Kentucky Tries To Keep Former Coal Miners From Leaving

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Herman "Dub" Tolbert, shown inside an American Legion post in Bokoshe, Okla., says the community is left exposed and he's determined to make regulators listen. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Communities Uneasy As Utilities Look For Places To Store Coal Ash

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Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky

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In 2006, a bulldozer sits ready for work at Peabody Energy's Gateway Coal Mine near Coulterville, Ill. Peabody is the latest coal company to declare bankruptcy. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

March 25: Bankruptcies Fuel Uncertainty In Coal Communities

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Oregon's large power utilities and environmental advocates have backed new legislation that phases out their use of coal. Here, a coal plant in Boardman, Ore., is seen in a 2014 file photo. Nigel Duara/AP hide caption

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Nigel Duara/AP

Reclaimed land that was once mined for coal in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. When coal companies declare bankruptcy, funding for land reclamation becomes a question Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy hide caption

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Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy

When Coal Companies Fail, Who Pays For The Cleanup?

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The coal plant in Shamokin Dam, Pa., is a local landmark that delivered electricity to this region for more than six decades. It closed in 2014. Next to it, a brand new natural gas power plant is under construction. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

From The Ashes Of Some Coal Plants, New Energy Rises

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The federal government will stop issuing new coal leases on some 570 million acres of federal land, under a new plan being released Friday. In this photo from 2013, coal is loaded onto a truck at a mine built on federally controlled land in Montana. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

A coal miner stands in the Dotiki mine, operated by Alliance Coal, in Webster County, Ky. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

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Steve Inskeep/NPR

In Kentucky, The Coal Habit Is Hard To Break

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A coal mound stands outside a Kentucky Utilities Co. station. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

India To U.S.: Cut Back On Your Consumption!

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New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, pictured during a speech last year, says Peabody Energy misled investors when it insisted it couldn't predict the impact of climate change regulation. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

Luliang is in recession, but developers continue to build apartment blocks even though demand for real estate is drying up. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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A 'Sense Of Crisis' Now In A Chinese Boomtown Gone Bust

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