Tommy Chreene with his horse, Lady, at home in Meaux, La. Chreene spent 26 years working on offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. While working on the Ursa project, he was part of a program designed to get the workers to open up emotionally with one another. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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No gambling here: When asked to weigh financial choices, teenagers were more likely to make careful choices than were young adults. David Chestnutt/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Residents of ShantiNiketan, a retirement community near Orlando, Fla., walk in a Hindu religious procession. Courtesy of ShantiNiketan Inc. hide caption

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Being With People Like You Offers Comfort Against Death's Chill

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Think of human relationships as entanglements. How do they bind you; how do they reveal who you really are? Daniel Horowitz for NPR hide caption

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By Impersonating Her Mom, A Comedian Grows Closer To Her

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By measuring activity in different parts of the brain, neuroscientsts can get a sense of how some people will respond to treatments. John Lund/Getty Images hide caption

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Brain Scans May Help Predict Future Problems, And Solutions

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The Biology Of Altruism: Good Deeds May Be Rooted In The Brain

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Psychologists say spanking and other forms of corporal punishment don't get children to change their behavior for the better. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Does she really think you're funny, or is she just being polite? Jon Feingersh/Getty/Getty Images/Blend Images RM hide caption

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Researcher Greg Bryant Speaks To NPR's Robert Siegel

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