Nialina Ba holds the only picture she has of her late husband, Bourang Ba (in the white shirt). Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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Why The Villages Are Losing Their Young Men

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Moyaad Saad, a 43-year-old former civil servant from Baghdad, feeds his 6-month-old daughter Zahara on their cot in a giant tent at a makeshift migrant camp near the border between Greece and Macedonia. Thousands of asylum seekers are now stuck here after several European countries closed their borders to them. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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As Europe Closes Door To Refugees, Tough Choices For 2 Fathers

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Aissatou Sanogo and her late husband, Souleymane Diaby. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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She Told Her Husband She Didn't Want Him To Leave For Europe

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Pope Francis (right) embraces Patriarch Bartholomew I, spiritual leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, during their joint visit to a center for migrants on the Greek island of Lesbos on Saturday. Both called on Europe to show greater compassion in dealing with migrants. Petros Giannakouris/AP hide caption

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The mothers of Militsa Kamvysi, 83, (left) and Maritsa Mavrapidou, 85, arrived on the Greek island of Lesbos nearly a century ago as refugees from what was then the Ottoman Empire (now Turkey). "We welcomed refugees because we're descended from refugees, too," Mavrapidou says. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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For These Greek Grandmas, Helping Migrants Brings Back Their Own Past

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Pope Francis welcomes Iranian President Hassan Rouhani at the Vatican on Jan. 26. The pope has been extremely active in global political affairs and has often been critical of the West. Pool/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Riace's medieval old town is a warren of winding cobblestone streets atop a hill. Migrants have revitalized the shopping district. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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A Small Town In Italy Embraces Migrants And Is Reborn

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Migrants and refugees pull down a border fence during clashes with Macedonian forces Sunday near a makeshift migrant camp in the northern Greek border village of Idomeni. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Teacher Mohammad Abdualamir and two students. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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A Swedish Town's Newest Residents Settle In And Make A New Start

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A Myanmarese migrant and her child seek care at a refugee health clinic in Mae Sot, Thailand. Mae Sot, a town along the Thai-Myanmar border, is home to many Myanmarese migrants, some of whom are there illegally. Wudan Yan/for NPR hide caption

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French President Francois Hollande (center right) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, (center left) before a meeting during an EU summit in Brussels on Friday. Stephane de Sakutin /AP hide caption

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Afghans seeking passports wait in line in Kabul on Jan. 20. Many Afghans are seeking to leave the country, though some have returned from countries like Germany after finding out that they were unlikely to receive asylum. Xinhua News Agency hide caption

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Feeling Unwanted In Germany, Some Afghan Migrants Head Home

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A migrant woman pictured in the northern Greek border station of Idomeni, on March 8. At least 14,000 people are stranded on the outskirts of the village as EU leaders try to control migrants entering Europe through the Balkan countries. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Asylum seekers from Afghanistan play football Feb. 7 in a resort in Halmstad, Sweden, where they are living temporarily. Sweden took in 163,000 migrants in 2015. Resistance to migrants is beginning to grow among some Swedes. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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As Migrants Flow In, Sweden Begins To Rethink Its Open-Door Policy

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European Council President Donald Tusk (front center) shakes hands with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu (front row, second from left) during a group photo at an EU summit Monday in Brussels. Francois Walschaerts/AP hide caption

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Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck have taken in two Afghan teenagers. Franck, who came to Sweden as a German refugee after World War II, says, "I'm remembering what was happening to me when I was a child." Courtesy of Hans Sick and Freia-Mai Franck hide caption

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Fleeing Alone, Some Migrant Kids Find Foster Homes In Sweden

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Amran, an unaccompanied minor from Afghanistan, at right, walks in the camp known as the Jungle with 35-year-old Farid Hamdan, a father of four, also from Afghanistan. "My heart is saying help him because he's only a kid," says Hamdan. "He has nobody else here to look after him." There are 300 to 400 children staying in the Jungle. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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A Young Afghan Migrant Makes His Way In The Calais 'Jungle'

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