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Indian female farmers sow paddy in a field during monsoon season near Allahabad on July 19, 2014. The monsoon rains, which usually hit India from June to September, are crucial for farmers whose crops feed hundreds of millions of people. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjay Kanojia/AFP/Getty Images

At Kemper, Mississippi Power has built an entirely new coal plant from the ground up. But the plant, which uses carbon capture technology, has experienced missed deadlines, cost overruns and other problems. Courtesy of Mississippi Power hide caption

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Courtesy of Mississippi Power

Climate-Friendly Coal Technology Works But Is Proving Difficult To Scale Up

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Scott Pruitt's comments on carbon dioxide come just over two weeks after he took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency with the authority to regulate CO2 and other greenhouse gases as pollutants. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

From field to bakery, a loaf of bread packs a measurable environmental punch. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

What's The Environmental Footprint Of A Loaf Of Bread? Now We Know

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Steam rises from the stacks of the coal-fired Jim Bridger Power Plant outside Point of the Rocks, Wyo., in March 2014. Jim Urquhart/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jim Urquhart/Reuters/Landov

Using Technology To Keep Carbon Emissions In Check

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Young boys in Beijing check a smartphone in front of their home near a coal-fired power plant. As China's economy slowed in 2015, its industrial use of coal likely dropped, too, researchers say. That may be behind the slight drop in global CO2 emissions. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Small, Surprising Dip In World's Carbon Emissions Traced To China

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Las Cañadas is an ecological cooperative in Veracruz, Mexico that's working to sequester carbon and mitigate climate change while producing food, materials, chemicals and energy. Courtesy of Ricardo Romero/Chelsea Green Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Ricardo Romero/Chelsea Green Publishing

An oil refinery is pictured in the southern Sydney suburb of Kurnell earlier this week. Australia's Senate voted on Thursday to scrap the country's carbon tax and plans for emissions trading — a major victory for conservative Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Jason Reed/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Jason Reed/Reuters/Landov

Wheat fields like this one could yield wheat with less zinc and iron in the future if they are exposed to higher levels of CO2, according to the journal Nature. Zaharov Evgeniy/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Zaharov Evgeniy/iStockphoto.com

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

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Vincent Schaefer, one of the General Electric scientists who worked on Project Cirrus in the 1940s, makes snow in the lab using dry ice. General Electric hide caption

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General Electric