About 70 percent of Earth is covered by clouds at any given moment. Their interaction with climate isn't easy to study, scientists say; these shape-shifters move quickly. NOAA/Flickr hide caption

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Climate Change May Already Be Shifting Clouds Toward The Poles

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Using an instrument they've named the HOLODEC, for Holographic Detector for Clouds, scientists can now see in fine detail the way air and water droplets mix at a cloud's wispiest edge. iStockphoto hide caption

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What's At The Edge Of A Cloud?

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Vincent Schaefer, one of the General Electric scientists who worked on Project Cirrus in the 1940s, makes snow in the lab using dry ice. General Electric hide caption

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