"I apologize," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Wednesday at a congressional hearing on problems with HealthCare.gov. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

One person who got a letter canceling his health insurance was Rep. Cory Gardner, R-Colo. He holds up the letter during a congressional hearing Wednesday on insurance problems. He says his family chose to buy private insurance rather than use the congressional plan. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Marilyn Tavenner was the first Obama administration official to testify before Congress about the troubled launch of HealthCare.gov. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gone is the smiling young woman who used to grace HealthCare.gov. Now it's time to get down to work. www.HealthCare.gov hide caption

itoggle caption www.HealthCare.gov

Protesters fill the Miami office of state Rep. Manny Diaz Jr. on Sept. 20 to protest his stance against expansion of health coverage in Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Joe Raedle/Getty Images

It all seemed so easy then. Back in June, the Supreme Court declared the Affordable Care Act constitutional. Waiting for that decision may have cost the administration precious time. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The mood wasn't sunny at the White House Rose Garden on Monday, as President Obama addressed the errors plaguing the computer system for health insurance enrollment. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

People wait to visit with volunteer counselors at Insure Central Texas in Austin on Oct. 1. Eric Gay/The Associated Press hide caption

itoggle caption Eric Gay/The Associated Press