German-born Robert Prager was lynched in Collinsville, Ill., in 1918. Some Germans and German-Americans were attacked during World War I. Courtesy of Jeffrey Manuel hide caption

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Courtesy of Jeffrey Manuel

During World War I, U.S. Government Propaganda Erased German Culture

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Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing visits Arlington National Cemetery in 1925. Pershing led the U.S. forces in World War I, the moment when the American military first displayed its might in a major foreign war. The U.S. military suffered heavy losses, but it also expanded dramatically, modernized and became more professional under Pershing's command. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

At A Hefty Cost, World War I Made The U.S. A Major Military Power

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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A tank heads off to support French troops in Juvigny, France, in this undated World War I photo. Tanks were introduced in the war. The watchmaker Cartier designed a metal band for its wristwatches based on tank treads, a tradition that continues to this day. Cartier's prototype for the tank watch was given as a gift to Gen. John Pershing, commander of the U.S. forces. AP hide caption

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AP

From Wristwatches To Radio, How World War I Ushered In The Modern World

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British soldiers stand among graves as they attend a vigil Thursday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme in northern France. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

During World War II, Potato Pete, a dapper cartoon spud with a jaunty cap and spats, instructed U.K. consumers on the humble tuber's many uses – not just in standards like scalloped potatoes and savory pies but also in more surprising options, like potato scones and waffles. Imperial War Museums (Art.IWM PST 6080) hide caption

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Imperial War Museums (Art.IWM PST 6080)

Allied troops at the ANZAC Cove in the Gallipoli peninsula, during World War I. Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand fought for nine months but could not defeat the Ottomans. Overall, a half-million were killed or wounded. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Remembering Gallipoli, A WWI Battle That Shaped Today's Middle East

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Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year. Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images

Last Armenian Village In Turkey Keeps Silent About 1915 Slaughter

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Prelates take pictures as Pope Francis celebrates an Armenian-Rite Mass to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, in St. Peter's Basilica, at the Vatican Sunday. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

British and German soldiers fraternizing at Ploegsteert, Belgium, on Christmas Day 1914. World War I was raging at the time, but front-line troops initiated the truce, which they documented in photos and letters. Commanders on both sides were furious when they learned of it. Courtesy of Imperial War Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Imperial War Museum

A Century Ago, When The Guns Fell Silent On Christmas

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Private Ernest Cable was buried in a cemetery in Wimereux, France. He died from dysentery in a hotel turned hospital in the northern French town. Courtesy of Genome Research Ltd hide caption

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Courtesy of Genome Research Ltd

British servicemen and artist Paul Cummins (second from right) walk past his art installation "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red," made of ceramic poppies, during an Armistice Day ceremony at the Tower of London on Tuesday. Stefan Wermuth/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Reuters/Landov

Plaster casts taken from soldiers' mutilated faces (top row), new sculpted faces (bottom row), and final masks (on the table) sit in the studio of Anna Coleman Ladd in 1918. American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

One Sculptor's Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

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This installation at the Tower of London will ultimately feature 888,246 ceramic poppies, honoring the soldiers from Britain and the British colonies who died in World War I. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Rich Preston/NPR

A Sea Of Ceramic Poppies Honors Britain's WWI Dead

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro with her husband, James Hider, and their dogs Nena (left) and Ursa. Tara Todras-Whitehill/Lourdes Garcia-Navarro hide caption

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Tara Todras-Whitehill/Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

An NPR War Correspondent Reflects On A Pet Turning 100 (In Dog Years)

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