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An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Mark Duncan/AP

Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says an increasing number of its chickens are now raised using "no antibiotics, ever." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Perdue Says Its Hatching Chicks Are Off Antibiotics

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Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr

Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses

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Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

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Cattle crowd inside a feedlot operated by JBS Five Rivers Colorado Beef in Wiley, Colo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

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Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

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Beef cattle stand in a barn on the Larson Farms feedlot in Maple Park, Ill. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Landov

Inside The Beef Industry's Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs

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Craig Rowles tends to his pigs in a barn near Carroll, Iowa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Are Antibiotics On The Farm Risky Business?

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A truckload of live turkeys arrives at a Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., in 2011. Most turkeys in the U.S. are regularly given low doses of antibiotics. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Turn Up Again In Turkey Meat

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