Chipotle restaurant workers fill orders for customers. The company is now sourcing some of its pork from a British supplier that uses antibiotics to treat pigs when ill. Gail Hansen, a veterinarian and longtime critic of antibiotic overuse on farms, welcomes this shift in Chipotle's stance on the drugs. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Chipotle's Hard Line On Swine Antibiotics Is Now Blurry

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Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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An order of McDonald's Chicken McNuggets in Olmsted Falls, Ohio. McDonald's says it plans to start using chicken raised without antibiotics important to human medicine. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Chicks in the Perdue hatchery in Salisbury, Md. The company says an increasing number of its chickens are now raised using "no antibiotics, ever." Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Perdue Says Its Hatching Chicks Are Off Antibiotics

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Young broilers nibble feed at a chicken farm in Luling, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has issued new guidance on how drug companies label antibiotics for livestock. Bob Nichols/USDA/Flickr hide caption

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Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses

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Turkeys sit in a barn in Sonoma, Calif. An estimated 46 million turkeys are cooked and eaten during Thanksgiving meals in the U.S. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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In recent years, pork producers have found ways to keep the animals healthy through improved hygiene. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs?

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Cattle crowd inside a feedlot operated by JBS Five Rivers Colorado Beef in Wiley, Colo. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Are Farm Veterinarians Pushing Too Many Antibiotics?

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Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

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Beef cattle stand in a barn on the Larson Farms feedlot in Maple Park, Ill. Daniel Acker/Landov hide caption

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Inside The Beef Industry's Battle Over Growth-Promotion Drugs

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