Some people marched in the rain Tuesday in the Philippine city of Tacloban, which was crushed by Typhoon Haiyan. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

itoggle caption David Guttenfelder/AP

In Tacloban, the Philippines, graffiti on the side of a grounded ship sends a message out to the world. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

An elderly woman and others leave after getting some help from Red Cross volunteers Monday in Dagami, the Philippines, about 20 miles south of the city of Tacloban. Millions of people need assistance because their homes were destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 8. Odd Andersen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Odd Andersen /AFP/Getty Images

A girl crosses between collapsed roof tops in the damaged downtown area in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

A mother breastfeeds her baby inside a chapel that was turned into a makeshift hospital after Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines. John Lavellana/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption John Lavellana/Reuters/Landov

Patients injured during Typhoon Haiyan lie in the halls of the Divine Word Hospital in Tacloban, the Philippines. Despite severe damage to the ground floor and the loss of the roof, the staff of the hospital keep treating patients. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

A boy stands amid ruins in Tacloban, the Philippines. The city of 220,000 was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

A relief worker looks over boxes of aid provided by the U.S. on November 14, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. Proponents of food aid reform say it makes more sense for the U.S. to buy food donations locally than ship them across the globe. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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These statues depict the historic return of U.S. Gen. Douglas MacArthur (in front) to Tacloban, the Philippines, during World War II. The typhoon last week toppled one of the statues of a Filipino official, as shown in this photo taken Tuesday. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Aaron Favila/AP

In Tacloban, the Philippines, on Thursday, some survivors waiting in a line to charge cellphones covered their faces because of the lingering smell of dead bodies. Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Philippe Lopez /AFP/Getty Images

In anguish: Tears ran down the cheeks of a man as he waited with other survivors Tuesday for a flight out of Tacloban in the Philippines, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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In Guiuan, the Philippines, the typhoon left behind destruction and left people fending for themselves in the first days after. John Alvin Villafranca/Courtesy of David Santos and the photographer hide caption

itoggle caption John Alvin Villafranca/Courtesy of David Santos and the photographer

The sun sets behind a house damaged by Typhoon Haiyan outside the hard-hit city of Tacloban. The Philippines has gotten better at preparing for typhoons, but remains extremely vulnerable. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food. Tara Yap/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Tara Yap/AFP/Getty Images

On Tuesday, a boy sat in the debris of destroyed houses in Tacloban, on the eastern Filipino island of Leyte. Noel Celis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Noel Celis /AFP/Getty Images

A woman comforts a pregnant relative suffering labor pains at a makeshift birthing clinic in the typhoon-battered city of Tacloban, Philippines, on Monday. Erik de Castro/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Erik de Castro/Reuters/Landov

Military personnel from the U.S. and the Philippines unload relief goods at the Tacloban airport, Nov. 11, 2013. Some reports estimate that 10,000 people may have died in the city of Tacloban. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images