David Gilkey is seen in 2013 at NPR's Afghanistan bureau as he started a month in the country. David wore silver bracelets on his wrist as a kind of good luck charm. He said every time he had a near-death experience, he let one go. He threw one into the Euphrates River after the second battle of Fallujah. Another went into the Helmand River after he covered the arrival of U.S. Marines in 2009. Graham Paul Smith/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Graham Paul Smith/NPR

David Gilkey Was 'An Incredibly Thoughtful' Photographer In The Midst Of Plight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480989001/480989009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Filipino man carries a dirty plastic sheet from his house after strong waves from Typhoon Hagupit battered a coastal village in Legazpi, Albay province, in the eastern Philippines, on Monday. Residents began trickling back to their homes after the local government said the typhoon has passed their province. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

toggle caption Aaron Favila/AP

A picture taken with a smart phone shows Syrian refugees queuing at one of the many UNHCR (United Nations Refugee Agency) registration centers in Lebanon. At the same time that civil wars and the Ebola outbreak are plaguing countries in Africa, Syrian and Iraqi refugees are seeking help from agencies. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

World's Aid Agencies Stretched To Their Limits By Simultaneous Crises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/341413632/341542632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man rides a motorcycle near houses that were rebuilt in an area in Banda Aceh, the capital of Indonesia's Aceh province, that was devastated by the tsunami that hit on Dec. 26, 2004. Heri Juanda/AP hide caption

toggle caption Heri Juanda/AP

From The Ruins Of A Tsunami, A Rebuilt Aceh Rises Anew

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/259405561/259533012" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A makeshift headstone in the mass grave outside of San Joaquin Parish in the province of Leyte, Philippines. The Catholic parish has lost almost two-thirds of its congregation after Typhoon Haiyan swept through the area. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

Filipino Priest Suffers With His Flock Amid Typhoon's Ruins

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/247329060/247392829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some people marched in the rain Tuesday in the Philippine city of Tacloban, which was crushed by Typhoon Haiyan. David Guttenfelder/AP hide caption

toggle caption David Guttenfelder/AP

On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn, in the Philippines, talks with Steve Inskeep

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/246287362/246278975" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In Tacloban, the Philippines, graffiti on the side of a grounded ship sends a message out to the world. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

An elderly woman and others leave after getting some help from Red Cross volunteers Monday in Dagami, the Philippines, about 20 miles south of the city of Tacloban. Millions of people need assistance because their homes were destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan on Nov. 8. Odd Andersen /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Odd Andersen /AFP/Getty Images

A girl crosses between collapsed roof tops in the damaged downtown area in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

A mother breastfeeds her baby inside a chapel that was turned into a makeshift hospital after Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines. John Lavellana/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption John Lavellana/Reuters/Landov

Patients injured during Typhoon Haiyan lie in the halls of the Divine Word Hospital in Tacloban, the Philippines. Despite severe damage to the ground floor and the loss of the roof, the staff of the hospital keep treating patients. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

A boy stands amid ruins in Tacloban, the Philippines. The city of 220,000 was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR

On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from Tacloban, the Philippines

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/245365690/245366596" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">