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A computer chip is seen on a newly issued credit card in this photo illustration taken in Encinitas, Calif., this week. In an effort to reduce counterfeit and credit card fraud, more than 200 million payment cards have been issued with embedded computer chips in the U.S., ahead of a Oct. 1 deadline for the switch to such cards, according to the Smart Card Alliance. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov

Computer chips are seen on newly-issued credit cards. In an effort to reduce counterfeiting and credit card fraud, more than 200 million payment cards have been issued with embedded computer chips in the U.S. ahead of an Oct. 1 deadline, according to the Smart Card Alliance. Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters/Landov

No More Swiping: New Credit Cards Designed To Reduce Theft

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In the years before the Great Recession, many Americans piled up too much credit card debt. Now, they seem to be a little wiser about using plastic, says Richard Cordray, who heads the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Watchdog: Consumers 'More Responsible' With Credit Card Debt

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To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

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Apple Pay is demonstrated at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Will Apple's Mobile Wallet Replace Your Leather Wallet?

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Kmart says it has removed malware that had infected its checkout registers in stores. The company believes the malware may have been in place for about a month before it was detected. Rachel Murray/Getty Images hide caption

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Rachel Murray/Getty Images

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday. The company unveiled a new mobile payment system called Apple Pay, which uses security built into the latest iPhones. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Lunch at the West Salem School District in Wisconsin. Michelle Kloser/ for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kloser/ for NPR

Cash Or Credit? How Kids Pay For School Lunch Matters For Health

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