Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

How China's One-Child Policy Led To Forced Abortions, 30 Million Bachelors

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Models for children's wear wait for a show during China Fashion Week in Beijing on Thursday. China announced an end to the one-child policy for urban couples that had been place for more than three decades. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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As China Lifts One-Child Policy, Many Chinese Respond With Snark

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A man looks at the painting Better To Have Only One Child at the China National Art Museum in Beijing. More than three decades after China's one-child policy took hold, some bereaved parents are suffering an unintended consequence of the policy: The loss of a child leaves them with no support in their old age. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Losing An Only Child, Chinese Parents Face Old Age Alone

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Children participate in a drawing contest on May 13 celebrating international children's day in Qingdao, China. Wu Hong/EPA/Landov hide caption

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