partition partition

107-year-old Mirza Naseem Changezi (left) sits with his son Khalid Changezi, 61, at their home in the Old City of New Delhi. Changezi is reputed to be the Old City's oldest resident and says there was never any question of leaving India for Pakistan. The Changezis trace their roots back 23 generations. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

For India's Oldest Citizens, Independence Day Spurs Memories Of A Painful Partition

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People pose in front of Pakistan Independence Day signs in Lahore. The country, created in 1947 as a homeland for South Asia's Muslims, celebrated 70 years of independence on Aug. 14. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

As Pakistan Marks 70 Years Of Independence, Its Minorities Struggle For Space

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Muslim refugees crowd onto a train as they try to flee India near New Delhi in September 1947. Some 15 million people crossed new borders during the violent partition of British-ruled India. At times, mobs targeted and killed passengers traveling in either direction; the trains carrying their corpses became known as "ghost trains." AP hide caption

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AP

Giving Voice To Memories From 1947 Partition And The Birth Of India And Pakistan

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