The earliest records of tiger nuts date back to ancient Egypt, where they were valuable and loved enough to be entombed and discovered with buried Egyptians as far back as the 4th millennium B.C. Now, tiger nuts are making a comeback in the health food aisle. Nutritionally, they do OK. Matailong Du/NPR hide caption

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Researchers discovered ancient animal mummies piled up in heaps inside a catacomb. Many of the mummies were in poor condition. Courtesy of Paul Nicholson hide caption

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Millions Of Mummified Dogs Found In Ancient Egyptian Catacombs

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The beef rib mummy that the researchers tested came from the tomb of Yuya and Tjuiu (sometimes spelled Tuyu). Seen here is a mask of Tjuiu, made out of gilded cartonnage, that was also found in their tomb. Andreas F. Voegelin/AP/Museum Of Antiquities Basel hide caption

toggle caption Andreas F. Voegelin/AP/Museum Of Antiquities Basel