EgyptAir hijack suspect Seif Eldin Mustafa (middle) is escorted by Cypriot police officers as he leaves a court after a remand hearing in Cyprus. Petros Karadjias/AP hide caption

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Petros Karadjias/AP

To selfie, or not to selfie? iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Narcissistic, Maybe. But Is There More To The Art Of The Selfie?

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A man takes a "selfie" while waiting in line to cast his vote in the Wisconsin gubernatorial race in November. Darren Hauck/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Hauck/Getty Images

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

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Selena Simmons-Duffin, NPR Producer, 28, Washington, D.C. Standard Census: #white. #nprcensus: #halfjewish #gaymarried #creative Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

This 2011 image taken by a crested black macaque in Indonesia has ignited a debate over who owns the photo. The camera's owner says the image belongs to him. In its new manual, the U.S. Copyright Office disagrees. David J Slater/Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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David J Slater/Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons

This 2011 image captured by a cheeky black macaque after turning the tables on a photographer who left his camera unmanned has ignited a debate over who owns the photo. David J Slater/Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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David J Slater/Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons