Tiny, shrimplike amphipods living in the Mariana Trench were contaminated at levels similar to those found in crabs living in waters fed by one of China's most polluted rivers. Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University hide caption

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Dr. Alan Jamieson/Newcastle University

Pollution Has Worked Its Way Down To The World's Deepest Waters

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Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

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"A lot of people are eating seafood all the time, and fish are eating plastic all the time, so I think that's a problem," says a marine toxicologist. iStockphoto hide caption

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