Hamlin oranges are washed, graded and packed for shipment at the Dundee Citrus Growers Association packing house in Lake Hamilton, Florida. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

After A Sour Decade, Florida Citrus May Be Near A Comeback

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Guy Davies, an inspector of the Florida Division of Plant Industry, shows an orange that is showing signs of "citrus greening." The disease is caused by a bacterium carried by the Asian citrus psyllid. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Harvesting oranges near Arcadia, Fla. The sacks that workers carry weigh about 90 pounds when they are full of fruit. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Guest Workers, Legal Yet Not Quite Free, Pick Florida's Oranges

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Oranges ripen in a grove in Plant City, Fla. Citrus greening, a disease spread by a tiny insect that ruins oranges and eventually kills the trees, has put the future of the state's $10 billion citrus industry in doubt. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

How Long Can Florida's Citrus Industry Survive?

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An orange showing signs of "citrus greening" this spring in Fort Pierce, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The 'Greening' Of Florida Citrus Means Less Green In Growers' Pockets

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Ripening fruit in a grove in Plant City, Fla., this month. Florida citrus growers are worried about citrus greening, which causes bacteria to grow on the leaf and fruit, eventually killing the tree. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Time Is Running Out To Save Florida's Oranges

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Oranges ripen in a Plant City, Fla., grove on Wednesday. Growers in Florida, Texas and California are worried about citrus greening, a disease that makes the fruit bitter and unmarketable. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

USDA Steps Up The Fight To Save Florida's Oranges

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