weapons weapons

Coalition forces fire a Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle during a training exercise in Afghanistan's Helmand province in 2013. Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS hide caption

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Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?

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Residents leave their houses in Thessaloniki, Greece, on Sunday as part of a mandatory evacuation. It preceded an operation to defuse a World War II bomb discovered there. Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images

The robotic skull of a T-600 cyborg used in the movie Terminator 3. Eduardo Parra/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Parra/Getty Images

Weighing The Good And The Bad Of Autonomous Killer Robots In Battle

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A woman with a cut on her cheek and trouble seeing with her left eye was admitted to Craig Joint Theater Hospital at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. X-rays showed a projectile that surgeons decided to remove. Forbes et al. 2016/Journal of Neurosurgery hide caption

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Forbes et al. 2016/Journal of Neurosurgery

Germany is the world's third-largest exporter of arms, like this bazooka destined for northern Iraq, being packed up at a German military base on Thursday. The country's economy minister has held up hundreds of weapons exports since he took office in December, angering many in the defense industry. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

Germany's New Economy Minister Takes Aim At Arms Exports

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Mikhail Kalashnikov, with his AK-47, in 2002. Jens Meyer/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jens Meyer/ASSOCIATED PRESS