It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

The We-Vibe classic is one of several Bluetooth-enabled We-Vibe products that can be paired with an app and controlled remotely. Customers alleged that the company that makes the vibrators was secretly tracking their use. Courtesy of Standard Innovations hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Standard Innovations

Amazon's personal assistant device Echo, powered by the voice recognition program Alexa, is one of the most popular gifts this holiday season. Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Luke MacGregor/Bloomberg/Getty Images

As We Leave More Digital Tracks, Amazon Echo Factors In Murder Investigation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507230487/507359612" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504467134/504467135" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Journalist Andrew McGill wanted to see if it was possible to hack a virtual toaster, after major servers were downed by connected appliances. He said it took less than an hour for hackers to find it. ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic hide caption

toggle caption
ProSymbols/The Noun Project/Andrew McGill/Courtesy of The Atlantic

An Experiment Shows How Quickly The Internet Of Things Can Be Hacked

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500253637/500264100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Intel announced last month that it is laying off 11 percent of its workforce. As sales of personal computers decline, the company plans to shift its business to cloud computing. Laura Rauch/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Rauch/AP

Left Behind In The Mobile Revolution, Intel Struggles To Innovate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476481238/476498783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FBI Director James Comey is one of the federal officials who has said that the growing use of encryption hurts the ability to track criminals. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Srakocic/AP

What Happens When Your Lights, Appliances Are Connected To The Internet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/454051683/454051684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Guido Rosa/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The World Loves The Smartphone. So How About A Smart Home?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/388992412/389023643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CES 2014: Toothbrush? Bed? Car? Put Some Internet On It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/260189445/260291030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript