A bicycle messenger struggles through the snow in downtown Cleveland on Friday. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Yes, The Weather Is Polar. No, It's Not The Vortex
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Here we go again. Earlier this month in St. Louis, Jerome Harris bundled up against frigid temperatures. Now, cold air is again rushing south from the Arctic and a "bomb" of a storm is brewing across much of the Eastern half of the nation. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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From the NPR Newscast: 'Bombogenesis'
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A man walks through a steam cloud in frigid cold temperatures Tuesday in Manhattan. Brendan McDermid /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Morrie Fisher drinks at Mawson Station, an Australian base in East Antarctica, in 1957. Apparently, these sorts of amusements tend to pop up when you're bored in a barren landscape. Courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division hide caption

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Ice has built up along Lake Michigan in Chicago as temperatures have plunged in recent days. A dip in the polar vortex is to blame. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': science writer Andrew Freedman talks with NPR's David Greene about the polar vortex
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