A cat stands on a playhouse in New Jersey, which could become the first state to ban the practice of declawing cats. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

A Declaw Law? Veterinarians Divided Over N.J. Cat Claw Bill

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The documentary Kedi gives a cat's-eye view of the back alleys, boho enclaves and rat-infested piers of Istanbul. Courtesy of Oscillscope hide caption

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Courtesy of Oscillscope

Ode To The Street Cat: 'Kedi' Follows Istanbul's Famous Felines

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Cat breeder Anthony Hutcherson shows off a Bengal Cat on Monday in New York. The Bengal Cat will be featured at the 141st Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in a non-competitive "meet the breeds" exhibition, where cats will be shown for the first time. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Melissa Galdis bridges with Ramon. Melanie Peeples hide caption

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Melanie Peeples

Yes, Cat Yoga Is A Thing Now, And It's Pretty Purrfect

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Fleas carry the bacteria that cause cat-scratch fever, so if your kitty is flea-free, you should be in the clear. Sara Lynn Paige/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Lynn Paige/Getty Images

A close-up of soldiers in a diorama called "Desperation at Skull Camp Bridge." Here, Union cavalry tries to stem a Confederate breakthrough. Ruth Brown/Courtesy of Civil War Tails hide caption

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Ruth Brown/Courtesy of Civil War Tails

A Mew-seum? Civil War Stories, Told With Tiny Tails

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Ginger, an English bulldog, stands watch while at work with her owner, Will Pisnieski, at Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif., in 2012. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 7 percent of employers allow pets at work. Grant Hindsley/AP hide caption

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Grant Hindsley/AP

Who Let The Dogs In? More Companies Welcome Pets At Work

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Larry, the chief mouser to the Cabinet Office, prowls outside the door of No. 10 Downing St. in London earlier this month. Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

Victoria Thomas' backyard was overrun with rats a few years ago. She tried everything from trenching and underground fencing to poison traps but nothing worked — until she got three feral cats. Courtesy of Victoria Thomas hide caption

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Courtesy of Victoria Thomas

Facing A Growing Rat Problem, A Neighborhood Sets Off The Cat Patrol

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