Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature hide caption

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Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

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Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

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