neurobiology neurobiology

Scientists placed two clusters of cultured forebrain cells side by side (each cluster the size of a head of a pin). Within days, the "minibrains" had fused and particular neurons (in green) migrated from the left side to the right side, as subsets of cells do in a real brain. Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University hide caption

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Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy

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This image is from lab-grown brain tissue — a minibrain — infected by Zika virus (white) with neural stem cells in red and neuronal nuclei in green. Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming hide caption

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Courtesy of Xuyu Qian and Guo-li Ming

'Minibrains' Could Help Drug Discovery For Zika And For Alzheimer's

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A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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Experimental drugs that clear clumps of proteins from the brains of Alzheimer's patients haven't panned out yet. Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Pasieka/Getty Images

Test Of Experimental Alzheimer's Drug Finds Progress Against Brain Plaques

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Scientists with the international scientific collaboration known as the "Walk Again Project" use noninvasive brain-machine interfaces in their efforts to reawaken damaged fibers in the spinal cord. AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature hide caption

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AASDAP and Lente Viva Filmes, São Paulo, Brazil/Nature

Researchers have long known that exercise is good for the brain. An enzyme produced by muscles might help explain why. Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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Monalyn Gracia/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

A Protein That Moves From Muscle To Brain May Tie Exercise To Memory

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Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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Takashi Kitamura/MIT

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

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