Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say. Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University
Checking DNA Against Elephants Hints At How Mammoths Got Woolly
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/419248169/419692441" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Adam Cole/NPR
Science-Based Artist Gives Celebrity Tortoise A Second Life
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/390153383/390245075" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A government official releases a rescued baby pangolin into the Sumatran forest in July 2012 after Indonesian police intercepted 85 endangered pangolins. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption AFP/Getty Images

Martha looks just as good today as she did in 1914. Elizabeth O'Brien/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

toggle caption Elizabeth O'Brien/Smithsonian Institution
Lone Passenger Pigeon Escapes Pie Pan, Lands In Smithsonian
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/325892534/326206022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Will the distant future give rise to exhibits of a human past long gone, much as we gawk today at representations of a dinosaur age we can only imagine? Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images