The main control room of the European Space Operation Center in Darmstadt, Germany, is pictured Friday during the controlled descent of the European Space Agency space probe Rosetta onto the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Daniel Roland/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Roland/AFP/Getty Images

An illustration of Rosetta just before Friday's expected landing on the comet known as 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The final approach aims to be only at "walking speed," mission specialists say, but that's enough to tip the antenna away from Earth. ATG medialab/ESA hide caption

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ATG medialab/ESA

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

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Photos taken on Friday, from more than a mile and a half from the comet, show Philae's three-foot-wide body and two of its three legs. The April 2015 image on the top right shows the comet overall, with the approximate location of Philae marked with a red dot. Main image and lander inset: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA; context: ESA/Rosetta/ NavCam hide caption

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Main image and lander inset: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA; context: ESA/Rosetta/ NavCam

The Philae lander, seen here heading to a comet's surface after leaving the Rosetta spacecraft in 2014, isn't expected to send any more signals, the European Space Agency says. ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team hide caption

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ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team

Close-ups of a curious surface texture on Comet 67P nicknamed "goosebumps," all of them at a scale of around 3 meters and spanning areas more than 100 meters. ESA/Rosetta/MPS hide caption

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ESA/Rosetta/MPS

The Rosetta spacecraft, which orbits the comet, captured this series of images of the Philae lander bounding off the surface. The precise spot the lander came to a stop remains unknown. Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA hide caption

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Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

The ESA released this composite panoramic image showing Philae's surroundings on Comet 67P. To illustrate the lander's orientation, the agency superimposed a sketch of the craft. ESA Rosetta/Philae/CIVA hide caption

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ESA Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

Engineers at the European Space Agency fear that they won't be able to communicate with the Philae lander after Friday. Here, lander manager Stefan Ulamec (left, in foreground) watches as data confirming the comet landing arrived Wednesday. European Space Agency hide caption

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European Space Agency

The Philae lander beamed back images showing one of its three feet on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko . This photo is compiled from two images; a wider version will be released later Thursday. ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA hide caption

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ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA

The Philae lander took this photo of its descent onto comet 67P Wednesday, when it was about 3 kilometers from the surface. The landing site is seen with a resolution of about 3 meters per pixel. ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS hide caption

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ESA/Rosetta/Philae/ROLIS

Europe's Rosetta spacecraft is about to send a lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. ESA/Rosetta/NavCam hide caption

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ESA/Rosetta/NavCam

Researchers To Attempt Robotic Landing On Comet's Surface

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