Paul Mesple is a fig farmer near the Central Valley town of Chowchilla, Calif. He and his partner farm around 2,000 acres of figs. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Dry conditions in California have limited the amount of pollen and nectar bees can collect. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Drought Is Driving Beekeepers And Their Hives From California
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This year, many of the pistachios grown in California's San Joaquin Valley are missing the green, fatty meat that nut lovers crave. Instead, they're empty inside, the result of drought, heat and weather pattern changes that have messed with pistachio tree fertilization. Kreg Steppe/Flickr hide caption

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Almonds hang from a branch at an orchard in Firebaugh, Calif. Despite the strain of prolonged drought, in 2014, California farms sold $54 billion worth of crops like almonds or grapes, and animal products like milk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Despite The Drought, California Farms See Record Sales In 2014
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Strawberry pickers in Watsonville, Calif. Many farmworkers in the state are out of work because of the severe drought. Those who do have a job are often working harder for less money. Lesley McClurg/For NPR hide caption

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Farmworkers See Jobs, Earnings Shrivel In California Drought
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UC Berkeley tree biologist Wendy Baxter is about to begin her ascent of a giant sequoia. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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To Measure Drought's Reach, Researchers Scale The Mighty Sequoia
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A town in California's Central Valley plans to transform farmland into an eco-friendly residential community. An artist's rendering shows plans for Kings River Village in Reedley, Calif. Courtesy of the City of Reedley hide caption

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California's Drought Spurs Unexpected Effect: Eco-Friendly Development
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Gary Broomell and his daughter, Debbie, pose behind a sign on their ranch in San Diego County. Their family has been growing citrus for generations, but lately, it's been hard staying in the black growing oranges, so they started a vineyard a few years ago. Lesley McClurg/ Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Squeezed By Drought, California Farmers Switch To Less Thirsty Crops
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The city of Modesto's wastewater treatment plant could supply millions of gallons of water to local farmers in California. Lauren Sommer for NPR hide caption

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Drought-Stricken California Farmers Look To Tap Urban Wastewater
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Five 2,500-gallon water tanks wait to be unloaded at the nonprofit Self-Help Enterprises near Visalia, Calif. So far about 140 tanks have been distributed to homes, but at least 1,000 more are needed in Tulare County alone. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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California's Driest Region Finds Short-Term Drought Aid
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The sun sets over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta near Rio Vista, Calif., in 2013. The delta is the largest West Coast estuary and a source of conflict over the state's water. Robert Galbraith /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Endangered Species Protections At Center Of Drought Debate
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This Alaskan cod taco with pickled radish salsa is one of several drought-friendly recipes that chef Nathan Lyon and his culinary manager, Sarah Forman, have cooked up. Courtesy of Sarah Forman hide caption

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Rudy Mussi's family has farmed in the Sacramento Delta region for nearly a century. Mussi worries that more water transfers will deplete the fragile Delta ecosystem and wipe out family farms like his. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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California's War Over Water Has Farmer Fighting Farmer
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A row of newly planted organic tomatoes on April 23, 2015 in Firebaugh, Calif. Some farmers are moving tomato production to the north of the state where water supplies are better. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Los Angeles started offering a $3.75 rebate on every square foot of grass replaced with a drought-friendly landscape. The drought is a boost in business for local conservation entrepreneurs. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty hide caption

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California's Drought Makes It Rain Big Bucks For Local Businesses
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A sign encouraging people to save water is displayed at a news conference in Los Angeles. Water use restrictions in California amidst the state's ongoing drought have led to the phenomenon of "droughtshaming," or publicly calling out water wasters. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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In California, Technology Makes Droughtshaming Easier Than Ever
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Tanimura & Antle workers use tractors to install drip tape into fields that will be used to grow lettuce and other crops in California's Salinas Valley. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Why California Farmers Are Conflicted About Using Less Water
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Mountain tops in Sierra Nevada, normally covered in snow this time of year, are seen nearly barren, near the Sequoia National Park during an aerial survey of the snowpack done by the California Department of Water Resources. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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