California drought California drought

Bidwell Marina at Lake Oroville in April in Oroville, Calif. After record rainfall and snow in the mountains, much of California's landscape has turned from brown to green and reservoirs across the state are near capacity. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

From Moonscape To Lush: Photographs Capture California Drought's Story

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Motorcyclists enter the Carrizo Plain National Monument near Taft, Calif., during a wildflower "super bloom" on Wednesday. After years of drought, an explosion of wildflowers in Southern and Central California is drawing record crowds. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Winter rains have eased the drought in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area northwest of Los Angeles. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

With Drought Emergency Over, Californians Debate Lifting Water Restrictions

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These Central Valley sheep are happily munching on sprouted barley grown indoors. Farmer Mario Daccarett says the barley, grown in shipping containers, is sweet and keeps his sheep full longer. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

With Water In Short Supply, One California Farmer Grows Feed Indoors

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Officials found the toxin microcystin in the blue-green algae present at Discovery Bay, Calif. For people exposed to the toxin, symptoms include dizziness, rashes, fever, vomiting and in more unusual cases, numbness. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Poisonous Algae Blooms Threaten People, Ecosystems Across U.S.

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A car destroyed by the Soberanes fire in Big Sur, Calif. Lodge managers and cafe owners there are facing cancelled bookings after fire officials warned that crews will likely be battling the fire for another month. Terry Chea/AP hide caption

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Terry Chea/AP

Firefighters battle part of the Sand Fire after flames jumped across a road in Santa Clarita, Calif., on Sunday. As the blaze changed direction multiple times over the weekend firefighters were forced to retreat and thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

A view of downtown Los Angeles as seen from Hollywood in November 2015. California faces permanent water restrictions, ordered Monday by Gov. Jerry Brown, in its fifth year of drought. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

The city of Fort Bragg, Calif., has ordered restaurants to drastically reduce the amount of dishwashing by serving customers with disposable plates, cups and flatware. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Students sort grapes at the University of California, Davis research winery. The winery is experimenting with various methods to conserve water. The hope is that commercial wineries will follow suit. Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen L Block/UC Davis

Paul Mesple is a fig farmer near the Central Valley town of Chowchilla, Calif. He and his partner farm around 2,000 acres of figs. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Dry conditions in California have limited the amount of pollen and nectar bees can collect. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Drought Is Driving Beekeepers And Their Hives From California

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This year, many of the pistachios grown in California's San Joaquin Valley are missing the green, fatty meat that nut lovers crave. Instead, they're empty inside, the result of drought, heat and weather pattern changes that have messed with pistachio tree fertilization. Kreg Steppe/Flickr hide caption

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Kreg Steppe/Flickr