A reconstruction of Kennewick Man sculpted to resemble the Ainu people of Japan, considered by some at the time to be his closest living relatives. Now, a link to Native Americans has been confirmed. Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute hide caption

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Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institute

Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

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Woolly mammoths depended on tiny flowering plants for protein. Did the decline of the flowers cause their extinction? Per Möller/Johanna Anjar hide caption

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Per Möller/Johanna Anjar

Woolly Mammoths' Taste For Flowers May Have Been Their Undoing

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