The most recent propaganda videos from Boko Haram have higher production values than in the past and other similarities to ISIS-produced videos. Boko Haram/Sendvid hide caption

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Boko Haram Takes A Page From ISIS Propaganda Playbook

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Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers. Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jordan's election laws make it impossible for any one political party to build a strong bloc in Parliament. Observers say that's one reason for the country's weakness — and for the growing appeal of the messages used by militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For One Parliamentarian, A Stronger Jordan Is Key To Fighting ISIS

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An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brutal ISIS Tactics Create New Levels Of Trauma Among Iraqis

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Training at a new camp near the front line, a mix of Arabs and Kurds prepare for an assault on Mosul in upcoming months. The men will wear balaclavas to conceal their identities while they fight, because they have family in Mosul and don't want to put their relatives at risk. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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From A Mountain, Kurds Keep Watch On ISIS In Mosul

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Relatives of Egyptian Coptic Christians purportedly murdered in Libya by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants mourn for those killed. Mohamed el-Shahed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ISIS Beheadings In Libya Devastate An Egyptian Village

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Before ISIS attacked it, the northern Iraqi town of Snuny had a population of nearly 150,000 — a mix of Kurdish Muslims and Yazidis, who belong to a religious ethnic minority in this region. Only about 10,000 have returned after Kurdish fighters reclaimed the city. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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ISIS May Be Gone, But Life Has Yet To Return To Normal In Northern Iraq

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The temple of Sharfadin in Northern Iraq is 800 years old, and followers of the Yazidi religion consider it one of the most sacred sites in the world. Though ISIS tried to destroy it, a small group of Yazidi fighters kept the shrine standing. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Outmanned And Outgunned, Fighters Defend Yazidi Shrine Against ISIS

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An Iraqi man inspects the remains of what are believed to be members of the Yazidi minority, in the northern village of Sinuni on Feb. 3. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In A Somber Homecoming, Yazidis Grieve And Watch Over Their Dead

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President Obama, flanked by Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, announces he has asked Congress for a war powers resolution against ISIS. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images News hide caption

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Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Safi al-Kasasbeh and his wife Saafia are the parents of Moath al-Kasasbeh, the Jordanian air force pilot captured by the self-proclaimed Islamic State in Syria. The worried parents are proud of their son, but say Jordan should not be involved in the coalition against ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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With A Son Missing, Family Questions Jordan's Mission Against ISIS

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Secretary of State John Kerry, left, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, center, and Iraqi Foreign Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari prior to a round table meeting of the global coalition to counter the Islamic State. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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The Islamic Youth Council in Derna, in eastern Libya, is among the local militant groups from Egypt to Libya that have reportedly pledged allegiance to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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With Cash And Cachet, The Islamic State Expands Its Empire

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Iraqi Kurdish soldiers, or peshmerga, patrol an area in the recently recaptured town of Zumar, near Mosul in northern Iraq on Oct. 29. When the Islamic State captured the town in August, the Kurds fled. Now that the Kurds are in control, the Arabs are all gone. STR/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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In A Back-And-Forth Battle, An Iraqi Town Splits On Ethnic Lines

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Aza Betwata (left) and his brother Mirwan (center) left Holland to join the Kurdish peshmerga fighting against ISIS militants in northern Iraq. Though the brothers come from a family of fighters, Aza had just two days of training — his brother must show him how to strip and clean his rifle. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Kurds Leave Life In Europe To Fight ISIS In Their Iraqi Homeland

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A family passes through Maktab Khaled in northern Iraq, the last Kurdish checkpoint before they make their way to Kirkuk. ISIS-controlled territory lies less than a mile away. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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The Artificial Boundary That Divides Iraq

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Alleged Islamic State militants stand next to an ISIS flag atop a hill in the Syrian town of Ain al-Arab, called Kobane by the Kurds, as seen from the Turkish-Syrian border in Suruc, Turkey, on Monday. Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Smuggler Explains How He Helped Fighters Along 'Jihadi Highway'

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