A spiraling torque from the second century A.D. is displayed as part of the exhibit called The Crimea - Gold and Secrets of the Black Sea in 2014 at Allard Pierson historical museum in Amsterdam. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Chebureki, thin, deep-fried pockets of cheese, meat or mushrooms, are a best seller at Musafir. The Tatar restaurant has become an asylum-seeker of sorts in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, in the wake of Russia's annexation of Crimea. Courtesy of Musafir hide caption

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Courtesy of Musafir

Russian President Vladimir Putin (center) joins Russia's federal highway agency head Roman Starovoit (left) and Crimean leader Sergei Aksyonov (second from left) on a visit to the Kerch Strait bridge construction site on Tuzla Island on March 18. The bridge will link Crimea to mainland Russia. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Russia's Crimea Bridge Project Beset By Engineering Worries And Labor Woes

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Russia recently introduced a new frigate, the Admiral Grigorovich, and invited journalists on board at the Russian base in Sevastopol, Crimea. While the Russians have had a naval base in Sevastopol since the 18th century, Russia's seizure of the entire Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 has heightened tensions with NATO. Corey Flintoff/NPR hide caption

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Corey Flintoff/NPR

The View From A Russian Frigate In Crimea

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The two sides of a new 100-ruble banknote depict a memorial to sunken ships in the port of Sevastopol, the site of Russia's naval base, and the Swallow's Nest, a mock castle on a clifftop near Yalta. Press-service of the Russian central bank/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Press-service of the Russian central bank/Reuters/Landov

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, who was shot dead last Friday, was one of the most outspoken critics of President Vladimir Putin. No arrests have been made in his killing. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Boris Nemtsov: 'He Directed His Words Against Putin Himself'

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Russian soldiers guard the entrance to the Ukrainian military base in Perevalne, Crimea, last March. Russia was criticized widely internationally after seizing the region. Now Russian lawmakers are considering a bill that says Crimea was illegally given to Ukraine in 1954 and should have been part of Russia all along. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

NPR's Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews President Obama on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office, where they discussed U.S. involvement in the Middle East and the world as a whole. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Waiting For A Break: Obama On 'Strategic Patience' In Foreign Policy

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President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on Dec. 23. Russia's current economic crisis stems from Western sanctions and diving oil prices. Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images

Sanctions Intensify Russia's Free Fall Into Economic Crisis

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks in front of the map of the Russian Federation, with Crimea on the left of the map, during his annual news conference in Moscow, Russia, on Thursday. The Kremlin has responded angrily to the latest round of U.S.-EU sanctions over the annexation of Crimea. Alexei Druzhinin/AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/AP

Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

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