Valentin Danilov, 83, is a former executive officer on a Soviet sub who proudly wears his old Soviet military uniform. Crimeans like Danilov have, without changing their residence, lived in three different countries in the past 25 years — the Soviet Union, then Ukraine and now Russia. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Max Avdeev for NPR

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Max Avdeev for NPR

A woman removes debris from a cafe that was destroyed during fighting between Ukrainian forces and pro-Russian militants Aug. 5 in the eastern Ukrainian city of Slavyansk, in the region of Donetsk. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Anatolii Stepanov/AFP/Getty Images

Crimea's new prime minister, Sergei Aksyonov (right), and the speaker of the legislature, Vladimir Konstantinov, attend a rally at Red Square in Moscow on March 18, the day Russia annexed the territory. Russia is pumping billions into Crimea after taking it from Ukraine. However, corruption has been a major problem in Crimea. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Pavel Golovkin/AP

President Vladimir Putin lays flowers during a ceremony marking Victory Day in the Crimean city of Sevastopol on Friday. It was his first visit to the region since Russia annexed it in March. Maxim Shemetov/Reuters/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Maxim Shemetov/Reuters/Landov

Communist Party supporters carry red flags during their rally to mark International Labor Day in downtown Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Thursday. In recent weeks, pro-Russia separatists have seized key installations in several cities in eastern Ukraine. Volodymyr Petrov/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Volodymyr Petrov/EPA/Landov

A Google Maps image from its Russian service depicts Crimea (bottom center) with a solid line, reflecting an international border between it and Ukraine. Versions of the map on other Google sites show it with a dotted line. Google Maps hide caption

itoggle caption Google Maps

A photo taken through a shattered window shows pro-Russian protesters in front of Ukrainian police guarding the Kharkiv regional state administration building Tuesday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption AFP/Getty Images