tipping tipping

A receipt from Centre Street Cafe in Jamaica Plain, Mass., includes a 3 percent "hospitality administration fee," which comes out to 39 cents on $13 of food sales. The entire fee goes to nontipped employees in the kitchen. Simón Rios/WBUR hide caption

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Simón Rios/WBUR

Restaurants Cook Up A New Way To Pay Kitchen Staff More: A Cut Of Sales

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Beijing-based restaurateur Song Ji (right) demonstrates his system, which allows customers to tip waitstaff. Diners use smartphones to scan QR codes that the waitstaff wear on their sleeves. This generates a tip of 4.56 yuan, or about 70 cents. Waitress Liu Enhui (left), the top tip-getter at the restaurant, says she can earn up to $30 a day in tips. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

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After Seattle's new minimum wage law took effect last April, Ivar's Seafood Restaurants announced it would immediately increase its prices by about 21 percent, eliminate tipping and pay all its hourly workers $15 per hour. Several other restaurants are adopting a no-tip policy to equalize the pay gap among employees, but many have gone back on that move. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Why Restaurants Are Ditching The Switch To No Tipping

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Imported from Europe, the custom of leaving gratuities began spreading in the U.S. post-Civil War. It was loathed as a master-serf custom that degraded America's democratic, anti-aristocratic ethic. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

At fine-dining places, white workers overwhelmingly fill jobs with the heftiest salaries, while Latinos, blacks and other minorities have jobs with pay closer to the poverty level, a study finds. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Staff in the kitchen of The Modern, a restaurant operated by Meyer's Union Square Hospitality Group and located in the Museum of Modern Art. Ellen Silverman/Union Square Hospitality Group hide caption

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Ellen Silverman/Union Square Hospitality Group

Danny Meyer To Banish Tipping And Raise Prices At His N.Y. Restaurants

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Diners fill Riverpark, a New York City restaurant, in January. Restaurateurs fear that the tipped-wage hike being proposed in New York will force them to get rid of tipping altogether. Brad Barket/Getty Images hide caption

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Brad Barket/Getty Images

Will A Tipped-Wage Hike Kill Gratuities For New York's Waiters?

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Figuring out how much to tip, and when, is a delicate science. Some businesses are integrating technology into how you pay to encourage you to tip more. Dan Bobkoff/NPR hide caption

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Dan Bobkoff/NPR

Technology May Turn You Into A Bigger Tipper

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