A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island in the Indian Ocean. It's not clear yet whether the debris is from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year. Yannick Pitou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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About 30 people believed to be relatives of Chinese passengers of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 that went missing a year ago, protest near the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing on Sunday. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Sgt. Trent Wyatt, a crew member of a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3 Orion, looks out in the search for MH370 over the Indian Ocean in April of last year. A Malaysian official says the search will continue through the end of May 2015, but if nothing is found, it is "back to the drawing board." Richard Wainwright/AP hide caption

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SkyTruth followed the ship Shin Jyi Chyuu 33 during one week last month. Planes are connected to a satellite network just like ships, but the information is only collected if the airline pays for it. Courtesy of SkyTruth via Exact Earth ShipView hide caption

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Science

Listeners To NPR: Why Don't We Track Planes Like We Do Ships?

Geoff Brumfiel, the physics guy on our science desk, helps us land on the right answer.

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Sarah Bajc's partner, Philip Wood, disappeared along with Flight MH370. "The issuance of the death certificate is an emotional thing," she says, "because we're not convinced that they're dead." Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Malaysia Airlines crew member inspects an airplane at Kuala Lumpur International Airport on Thursday. The carrier announced it was laying off a third of its workforce amid steep financial losses. Azhar Rahim/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Malaysia Airlines had been struggling even before two of its flights were lost this year. Analysts say the national carrier faces either bankruptcy or privatization. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People walk amid debris Thursday at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way

Obama: Evidence MH17 Hit By Missile From Rebel-Held Area Of Ukraine

The president says at least one U.S. citizen is among the nearly 300 people killed when the plane crashed in the eastern Donetsk region.

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This screen grab from Flightradar24.com shows the pocket of open airspace above Ukraine after a Malaysia Airlines flight crashed in the eastern part of the country. Flightradar24.com hide caption

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The Australian ship Ocean Shield, seen here earlier this month, has been ordered back to its dock, after a search for the black boxes of a missing Malaysian airliner ended without finding anything. Paul Kane/Getty Images hide caption

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Ships continued to search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 on Wednesday. They were looking in an area about 1,000 miles northwest of Perth. Ocean Shield is an Australian ship that has been looking for the jet's black boxes. Australian Maritime Safety Authority hide caption

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Sgt. Trent Wyatt looks out an observation window on Friday from aboard a Royal New Zealand air force P-3 Orion maritime search aircraft as it flies over the southern Indian Ocean. So far there's been no sign of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370. But officials are hoping that sounds detected below the surface are coming from one or both of the plane's black boxes. Richard Wainwright/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A Royal Australian Air Force AP-3C Orion flew past the Australian defense vessel Ocean Shield on Wednesday as the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 continued in the southern Indian Ocean. LSIS Bradley Darvill/Australian Defense Force/AP hide caption

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A crewman on a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3 Orion searches for possible debris from the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, in the southern Indian Ocean earlier this month. Kim Christian/AP hide caption

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Angus Houston displays a map of the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 Monday. Houston says an Australian navy ship has detected underwater signals consistent with aircraft black boxes, calling it the "most promising lead" so far in the month-old search. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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