Relatives of passengers on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 hold placards following a joint news conference on the search for the missing airliner Friday. The search will be suspended if nothing turns up in the current area, officials say. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images

A Jan. 2 sonar image, released by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau on Wednesday, shows a shipwreck on the ocean floor off the coast of Australia. The undersea search for the Malaysian airliner that vanished almost two years ago came across the wreckage deep in the Indian Ocean off the coast of western Australia, officials said. ATSB/AP hide caption

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ATSB/AP

French officers carry a wing fragment, called a flaperon, that washed ashore on La Réunion island in the Indian Ocean on July 29. Raymond Wae Tion/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Raymond Wae Tion/EPA /LANDOV

Surrounded by journalists, a relative of passengers of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 wears a sign reading "Must return safely!" during a protest held by victims' families Thursday outside the Malaysia Airlines office in Beijing. Rolex Dela Pena/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Rolex Dela Pena/EPA /LANDOV

Debris from an airplane that was found on the Indian Ocean island of Reunion has been transported to France, where technicians will try to determine whether it is from a missing airliner, Flight MH370. Raymond Wae Tion/Maxppp /Landov hide caption

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Raymond Wae Tion/Maxppp /Landov

Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss (left), Malaysia's Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai (center) and Chinese Transport Minister Yang Chuantan shake hands after a news conference about Flight MH 370 on Thursday. The search zone for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight will be doubled if nothing is found in the huge undersea area now being scanned for wreckage. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images

About 30 people believed to be relatives of Chinese passengers of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 that went missing a year ago, protest near the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing on Sunday. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

Sgt. Trent Wyatt, a crew member of a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3 Orion, looks out in the search for MH370 over the Indian Ocean in April of last year. A Malaysian official says the search will continue through the end of May 2015, but if nothing is found, it is "back to the drawing board." Richard Wainwright/AP hide caption

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Richard Wainwright/AP

Sarah Bajc's partner, Philip Wood, disappeared along with Flight MH370. "The issuance of the death certificate is an emotional thing," she says, "because we're not convinced that they're dead." Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images

A Vanished Jetliner Still Haunts Families Of The Missing

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A Malaysia Airlines crew member inspects an airplane at Kuala Lumpur International Airport on Thursday. The carrier announced it was laying off a third of its workforce amid steep financial losses. Azhar Rahim/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Azhar Rahim/EPA/Landov

The Australian ship Ocean Shield, seen here earlier this month, has been ordered back to its dock, after a search for the black boxes of a missing Malaysian airliner ended without finding anything. Paul Kane/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Kane/Getty Images

Angus Houston displays a map of the search area for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 Monday. Houston says an Australian navy ship has detected underwater signals consistent with aircraft black boxes, calling it the "most promising lead" so far in the month-old search. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Angus Houston, head of the Joint Agency Coordination Center leading the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, says ships are being sent to investigate reports of a signal being detected on a frequency used by black box equipment. Tony Ashby/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Ashby/AFP/Getty Images

A map shows the location of a pulse signal that was reportedly detected by a Chinese patrol ship searching for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. China's state-run media says the signal is being investigated as a possible clue to the missing airliner's final location. Google Maps hide caption

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Google Maps

Newly arrived Chinese relatives of passengers of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 hold banners while talking to reporters at a hotel in Malaysia Sunday. The search continues for the jetliner that went missing three weeks ago. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP