Uber Uber

For the business to survive, Uber has to repair its relationship with drivers, which leaders at the company say is "broken." Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Liam James Doyle/NPR

To Keep Drivers From Leaving, Uber Tries To Treat Them Better

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539227139/539334508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick, pictured here at a Vanity Fair summit in October 2016, resigned abruptly this week as the company's CEO after weeks of scandals about workplace culture. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

After CEO Resignation, Is Uber Kalanick-less Or Kalanick-free?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533791446/533849793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Freada Kapor Klein stands on a staircase at the Kapor Center for Social Impact in Oakland, Calif. She is a high profile investor, who invested early on with Uber. She has used her voice and her money in a decades-long effort to promote more diversity in Silicon Valley. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Talia Herman for NPR

The Investor Who Took On Uber, And Silicon Valley

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/532973451/533102658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One Uber driver is available in Muncie, Ind., at 7 p.m. on a recent weeknight. Through dozens of interviews and an informal survey, NPR found that hundreds of Uber drivers feel the company is not living up to its "Be Your Own Boss" promise. Lucas Carter for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lucas Carter for NPR

The Faceless Boss: A Look Into The Uber Driver Workplace

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531642304/532100148" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Uber's San Francisco headquarters earlier this year. The company fired 20 employees after an investigation of sexual harassment and other complaints. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Uber Fires 20 Employees After Sexual Harassment Claim Investigation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531806891/531859909" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Starsky Robotics is retrofitting large trucks to make them driverless. The startup hopes that by the end of the year, it will be able to operate a truck without a person physically sitting in the vehicle. Courtesy of Starsky Robotics hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Starsky Robotics

Each autonomous vehicle has two Uber exployees in the front seat; one is ready to grab the wheel and apply a foot to the brake pedal, the other in the passenger seat, has a computer screen showing what the car's rooftop laser-bouncing radar is seeing. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Art Silverman/NPR

Pittsburgh Offers Driving Lessons For Uber's Autonomous Cars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/522099560/522503927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wang Fei, 35, from southwest China's Chongqing region, drove cars for Didi Chuxing, China's main ride-hailing service, from last July until January, when new local rules banned out-of-town cars and drivers, and Didi cut bonuses to drivers. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, As In The U.S., The Fight Over Ride Hailing Is Local

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521650068/521693436" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ariana Huffington speaks on stage during a conference in 2016 in New York City. She's taking a bigger role at Uber. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

Can Arianna Huffington Save Uber?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521319706/521337615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this 2015 photograph, Uber co-founder and CEO Travis Kalanick speaks during the opening of the Digital Life Design Conference in Munich. Tobias Hase/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tobias Hase/AFP/Getty Images

Anthony Levandowski, who co-founded Otto and is now head of Uber's self-driving-vehicle project, is accused of taking proprietary designs and information with him when he left the Google spinoff Waymo. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

In her blog post, Rigetti describes sexual harassment and systemic sexism at Uber, where she worked for only a year. The post comes at a time when Uber has already been under fire from the #DeleteUber campaign. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, shown here in December 2016, has left President Trump's business advisory board because of flak from the president's critics. MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images

Uber CEO Leaves Business Council After Criticism From Trump Opponents

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513133535/513196801" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Tuesday, an Uber driverless car waits in traffic during a test drive in San Francisco. The ride-hailing company is refusing to obey demands by the state's Department of Motor Vehicles that it stop picking up San Francisco passengers in specially equipped Volvo SUVs. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP