Anthony Levandowski, who co-founded Otto and is now head of Uber's self-driving-vehicle project, is accused of taking proprietary designs and information with him when he left the Google spinoff Waymo. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

In her blog post, Rigetti describes sexual harassment and systemic sexism at Uber, where she worked for only a year. The post comes at a time when Uber has already been under fire from the #DeleteUber campaign. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick, shown here in December 2016, has left President Trump's business advisory board because of flak from the president's critics. MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MONEY SHARMA/AFP/Getty Images

Uber CEO Leaves Business Council After Criticism From Trump Opponents

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/513133535/513196801" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Tuesday, an Uber driverless car waits in traffic during a test drive in San Francisco. The ride-hailing company is refusing to obey demands by the state's Department of Motor Vehicles that it stop picking up San Francisco passengers in specially equipped Volvo SUVs. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Police surround McDonald's restaurant employees who were sitting in an intersection in Los Angeles after walking off the job to demand a $15 minimum wage and union rights during nationwide "Fight for $15" protests on Tuesday. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

A study by researchers at MIT and the University of Washington found that black men in Boston were twice as likely to have their rides cancelled by Uber drivers. LeoPatrizi/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
LeoPatrizi/Getty Images

A self-driving car leaves Uber's newest riverside hub in Pittsburgh. Company officials say the Rust Belt city is perfect for beta testing, citing diverse topography, frequent weather maladies, near-constant construction and hundreds of bridges and tunnels. Megan Harris/WESA hide caption

toggle caption
Megan Harris/WESA

What It's Like To Ride In A (Nearly) Self-Driving Uber

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/493823483/493881392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Juno CEO Talmon Marco talks with driver Fara Louis Jeune. The company recruited drivers by looking at Uber cars with the highest ratings. Juno hide caption

toggle caption
Juno

Uber Competitor In NYC Promises Drivers Benefits, Even Employee Status

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490655700/490969901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber, the San Francisco-based ride-hailing service has been dealt a legal setback in its effort to settle a multi-million dollar claim by drivers who say they should be reclassified as employees, not independent contractors. On Thursday, a federal judge rejected Uber's $100 million settlement offer. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Ride-booking company Uber plans to offer customers self-driving cars in Pittsburgh soon. The vehicles will come with human backup drivers. Jared Wickerham/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jared Wickerham/AP

Uber To Roll Out Self-Driving Cars In Pittsburgh

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490524020/490524021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Uber Station is shown outside a hotel in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. Uber spent $1 billion in China last year, but only got a share of around 10 percent, compared to Didi Chuxing's more than 80 percent. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Battle Uber Didn't Win

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488477289/488477290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Although Uber has repeatedly extolled drunken-driving reduction as a benefit of its service, a new study of data from across the U.S. finds ride-sharing apps have had no effect on alcohol-related traffic fatalities. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP
Eric Risberg/AP

Under Pressure, Lawyer For Uber Drivers Slashes Her Fees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482041499/482055785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Lyft van sits outside the Austin Convention Center in March, during the 2016 SXSW Festival. The ride-hailing company, along with its competitor Uber, has now vowed to "pause" operations in the city, after Austin voters sided against the ride-hailing apps in a dispute over regulations. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

toggle caption
Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Jesse Vega checks out a vehicle at an Uber "Work On Demand" recruitment event March 10 in South Los Angeles. The company is researching ways to get rid of its surge pricing, a feature that drivers like but that can make costs unpredictable for consumers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Uber Plans To Kill Surge Pricing, Though Drivers Say It Makes Job Worth It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476513775/476559549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fare summary on the Uber app in the car of an UberX driver in Washington, D.C. Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images

How Much Money Do Uber Drivers Really Make? Send Us Your Screenshots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475592357/475631351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript