Altamonte Springs, Fla., is helping pay for Uber rides that begin and end in the city. The city is the first in the country to partially subsidize Uber fares. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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The Newest Public Transportation In Town: Uber
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Uber driver Karim Amrani sits in his car parked near the San Francisco International Airport in July. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Business Travelers Often Skip The Rental Car, Use Uber Instead
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A car with Uber and Lyft stickers at Los Angeles International Airport. Uber dominates the fast-growing ride-hailing business. But Lyft is waging a spirited battle to keep up. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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In The Battle Between Lyft And Uber, The Focus Is On Drivers
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Supporters cheer during a meeting Monday when the Seattle City Council voted to approve a measure that would allow ride-sharing drivers for Uber and other ride services to unionize. Matt Mills McKnight/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Fact Checking Uber On Labor Laws
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Deco Carter, who drives mostly for Lyft, a ride-hailing service, has been involved in two auto accidents that left him unable to work while his car was being repaired. Alan Toth/KQED hide caption

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A federal judge in California has allowed some Uber drivers to proceed with a class-action suit against the company. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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How A Suit Against Uber Could Redefine The Sharing Economy
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Uber, Lyft And No More Loans: Twilight Is Here For Big-City Taxi Barons
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Traffic stands still in Nairobi. People in Kenya's capital don't like getting into cabs driven by strangers. They prefer to call drivers they know or who their friends recommend. Goran Tomasevic/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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A Taxi App Aims To Build Trust Where Crime Is High
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Joel Xu, 25, drives in Shanghai for People's Uber, a ride-sharing service. He makes about $4,000 a month – a good wage in Shanghai – and loves meeting new people he'd otherwise never encounter. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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People's Republic Of Uber: Making Friends, Chauffeuring People In China
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The Interview starring James Franco and Seth Rogen opened in 331 mostly independent theaters and on streaming sites Christmas Day. It's estimated to rake in $4 million in its opening weekend. Marcus Ingram/Getty Images hide caption

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The app-based car service Uber has had a big year for business --€” and controversy. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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As Uber Expands, It Asks Cities For Forgiveness Instead Of Permission
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