Ride-booking company Uber plans to offer customers self-driving cars in Pittsburgh soon. The vehicles will come with human backup drivers. Jared Wickerham/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jared Wickerham/AP

Uber To Roll Out Self-Driving Cars In Pittsburgh

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/490524020/490524021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An Uber Station is shown outside a hotel in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. Uber spent $1 billion in China last year, but only got a share of around 10 percent, compared to Didi Chuxing's more than 80 percent. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Battle Uber Didn't Win

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488477289/488477290" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Although Uber has repeatedly extolled drunken-driving reduction as a benefit of its service, a new study of data from across the U.S. finds ride-sharing apps have had no effect on alcohol-related traffic fatalities. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption Eric Risberg/AP
Eric Risberg/AP

Under Pressure, Lawyer For Uber Drivers Slashes Her Fees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/482041499/482055785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Lyft van sits outside the Austin Convention Center in March, during the 2016 SXSW Festival. The ride-hailing company, along with its competitor Uber, has now vowed to "pause" operations in the city, after Austin voters sided against the ride-hailing apps in a dispute over regulations. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

toggle caption Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Jesse Vega checks out a vehicle at an Uber "Work On Demand" recruitment event March 10 in South Los Angeles. The company is researching ways to get rid of its surge pricing, a feature that drivers like but that can make costs unpredictable for consumers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Uber Plans To Kill Surge Pricing, Though Drivers Say It Makes Job Worth It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476513775/476559549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A fare summary on the Uber app in the car of an UberX driver in Washington, D.C. Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Evelyn Hockstein/The Washington Post/Getty Images

How Much Money Do Uber Drivers Really Make? Send Us Your Screenshots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475592357/475631351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Altamonte Springs, Fla., is helping pay for Uber rides that begin and end in the city. The city is the first in the country to partially subsidize Uber fares. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Chiu/AP

The Newest Public Transportation In Town: Uber

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473422686/473623587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber driver Karim Amrani sits in his car parked near the San Francisco International Airport in July. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Chiu/AP

Business Travelers Often Skip The Rental Car, Use Uber Instead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463750503/463789791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A car with Uber and Lyft stickers at Los Angeles International Airport. Uber dominates the fast-growing ride-hailing business. But Lyft is waging a spirited battle to keep up. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images

In The Battle Between Lyft And Uber, The Focus Is On Drivers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463473462/463503908" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supporters cheer during a meeting Monday when the Seattle City Council voted to approve a measure that would allow ride-sharing drivers for Uber and other ride services to unionize. Matt Mills McKnight/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Matt Mills McKnight/Reuters/Landov

Fact Checking Uber On Labor Laws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460013970/460034624" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Deco Carter, who drives mostly for Lyft, a ride-hailing service, has been involved in two auto accidents that left him unable to work while his car was being repaired. Alan Toth/KQED hide caption

toggle caption Alan Toth/KQED

A federal judge in California has allowed some Uber drivers to proceed with a class-action suit against the company. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Chiu/AP

How A Suit Against Uber Could Redefine The Sharing Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/436820824/436820825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber, Lyft And No More Loans: Twilight Is Here For Big-City Taxi Barons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430221591/430221592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript