Solar energy panels on a roof in Marshfield, Mass. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

Should Homeowners With Solar Panels Pay To Maintain Electrical Grid?

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In Del Norte, Colo., Public Works Supervisor Kevin Larimore shows off solar panels that provide electricity for the town's water supply. Despite generating its own solar energy, the town is still at risk of a blackout if its main power line goes down. Dan Boyce/Inside Energy hide caption

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Dan Boyce/Inside Energy

When The Power's Out, Solar Panels May Not Keep The Lights On

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A worker repairs electrical lines in Plainview, N.Y., after Superstorm Sandy in 2012. A proposed plan to overhaul the state's power grid could help the system better withstand severe weather and enable energy to be stored and managed more efficiently. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

New York Says It's Time To Flip The Switch On Its Power Grid

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A power outage in August 2003 darkened New York City. A report warns that the national power grid could be knocked out if just a handful of key power stations were sabotaged. George Widman /AP hide caption

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George Widman /AP