Testing for prostate cancer has declined after a recommendation in 2012 said it shouldn't be routine. iStockphoto hide caption

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Prostate Screening Drops Sharply, And So Do Cancer Cases
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The American Cancer Society has pushed back the age at which most women should begin having mammograms to 45. iStockphoto hide caption

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Cancer Group Now Says Most Mammograms Can Wait Till 45
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Although false alarms are not at all unusual when it comes to mammograms, they can cause women much anxiety. Doctors are thinking about ways to ease those fears. iStockphoto hide caption

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Dr. George Papanicolaou discovered that it was possible to detect cancer by inspecting cervical cells. The Pap smear, the cervical cancer screening test, is named after him. American Cancer Society/AP hide caption

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Catharine Becker of Fullerton, Calif., was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 43 despite having a clean mammogram. The mother of three didn't know she had dense breast tissue until after she was diagnosed. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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This spiral CT image of the chest shows a large malignant mass (purple) in one lung. A conventional chest X-ray could have missed this tumor, radiologists say. Medical Body Scans/Science Source hide caption

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Why Some Doctors Hesitate To Screen Smokers For Lung Cancer
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Many people think that colon cancer screening is no walk in the park. This giant inflatable colon on display at the University of Miami Health System campus was intended to help them think otherwise. Suzette Laboy/AP hide caption

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