The bright yellow steel truss bridge over St. John's River is the official border crossing between Liberia and Guinea. The Liberian-Guinean border has been closed since the early days of the Ebola outbreak. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Community workers build an Ebola clinic on Nov. 8 in Lokomasama, near Port Loko, Sierra Leone. The community decided to organize and fight the disease — building a holding center for suspected cases, enforcing a travel ban. It created a $100 fine for a handshake and a $200 fine plus six months in jail for an illegal burial. Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Francisco Leong/AFP/Getty Images

Red Cross workers in Guinea carry the body of an Ebola victim to a cemetery full of fresh graves for others who have succumbed to the disease. Kristin Palitza/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Kristin Palitza/Corbis

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, left, listens Friday as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie talks at a news conference in New York. The governors announced a mandatory quarantine for people returning to the United States through airports in New York and New Jersey who are deemed to be at "high risk" for Ebola. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Lennihan/AP

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited West Point in August, when the impoverished neighborhood was quarantined to prevent the spread of Ebola. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

A market area sat empty last month in Freetown, Sierra Leone, as the country's government enforced a three-day lockdown in an attempt to halt the spread of the Ebola virus. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Duff/AP

Eerie protective suits and shiny body bags have fueled rumors about the origins of Ebola. Here, a burial team removes the body of a person suspected to have died from the virus in the village of Pendembu, Sierra Leone. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Testing for Ebola, a scientist in a mobile lab at Gueckedou, Guinea, separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate the virus's genetic sequence. Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov

Rose Komano, 18 and the mother of three, was the first Ebola patient to overcome the virus in southeastern Guinea, the epicenter of the outbreak. On April 3, she posed at a health clinic in the Gueckedou region. Misha Hussain /Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Misha Hussain /Reuters /Landov

The new normal in Guinea is washing hands with a mixture of water and bleach--shown here at the border entrance of Buruntuma, in the Gabu area on Tuesday. Tiago Petinga/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

itoggle caption Tiago Petinga/EPA /LANDOV

A nurse of the 'Doctors without Borders' medical aid organisation examines a patient in the in-take area at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms — the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images