Soldiers carry a victim on a stretcher in Mocoa, Colombia, on Saturday, after an avalanche of mud and water from an overflowing river swept through the city as people slept. The incident triggered by intense rains left at least 125 people dead. Colombian National Army via AP hide caption

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Colombian National Army via AP

A sign memorializes the devastating mudslide that killed 43 people in Oso, Wash., one year ago. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

One Year After Mudslide, First Responders Tackle Emotional Damage

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Marine One, carrying President Obama, takes an aerial tour of Oso, Wash., on Tuesday. The president made a brief stop in the area devastated by last month's mudslide. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Washington mudslide survivor Amanda Skorjanc, 25, spoke from her hospital bed Wednesday about what it was like when her home was engulfed. She and her infant son, Duke, survived. Dan Bates/The Herald/AP hide caption

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Dan Bates/The Herald/AP

Gabriella Botamanenko (center left) hugs her mother, Angela Botamanenko, during a vigil for mudslide victims at the Darrington Community Center Saturday. A March 22 mudslide in a nearby community killed at least 30 and left many missing. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ryder/Getty Images