synthetic biology synthetic biology

EVATAR is a book-size lab system that can replicate a woman's reproductive cycle. Each compartment contains living tissue from a different part of the reproductive tract. The blue fluid pumps through each compartment, chemically connecting the various tissues. Courtesy of Northwestern University hide caption

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Courtesy of Northwestern University

Device Mimicking Female Reproductive Cycle Could Aid Research

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University
Scott Tysick/Getty Images

Scientists Say They Hope To Create A Human Genome In The Lab

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In 2010, scientists plopped the genetic material of one Mycoplasma bacterium into another type to create the self-replicating cells shown above. Six years later, they've come out with an even simpler synthetic organism that has fewer genes. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/Science Source hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/Science Source

Scientists Build A Live, No-Frills Cell That Could Have A Big Future

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Cambrian Genomics says that what it calls a DNA printer is essentially a DNA sorter — it quickly spots and collects the desired, tailored stretch of DNA. Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics hide caption

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Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

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Biohazard suits used to handle dangerous microbes hang in a laboratory at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Fort Detrick, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

An outbreak of bird flu in India in 2008 prompted authorities to temporarily ban the sale of poultry. Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images

Biologists Choose Sides In Safety Debate Over Lab-Made Pathogens

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Being able to insert the two man-made letters into DNA, alongside the usual four-letter alphabet, could teach old cells new tricks and lead to better drugs, researchers say. courtesy of Synthorx hide caption

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courtesy of Synthorx

Chemists Expand Nature's Genetic Alphabet

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The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda hide caption

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Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

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