Rescuers untangle a gray whale from ghost net off the coast of California. Bob Talbot/Marine Photobank/Courtesy of World Animal Protection hide caption

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Bob Talbot/Marine Photobank/Courtesy of World Animal Protection

On March 23, a man unloads fish from the U.S. fishing vessel the Sea Dragon at Pier 38 in Honolulu. According to an Associated Press report, Americans buying Hawaiian seafood are almost certainly eating fish caught by foreign workers hired through a U.S. government loophole that allows them jobs but exempts them from most basic workplace protections. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP
Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Fish Have Feelings, Too: The Inner Lives Of Our 'Underwater Cousins'

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Peruvian anchoveta being processed at a fish meal factory in Lima in 2009. The small forage species has been heavily fished. Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images

The captain and crew of the Moriah Lee pose with sablefish caught off the coast of Half Moon Bay, Calif. A new study found that fishermen in the West Coast sablefishery were much less likely to engage in risky behavior — like sailing out in stormy weather — after catch share quotas were implemented. Courtesy of Ethan Righter hide caption

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Courtesy of Ethan Righter

Chef Michael Cimarusti, of Los Angeles' Providence restaurant, is pioneering the West Coast incarnation of Dock to Dish, a program that hooks up local fishermen directly with chefs. Courtesy of Providence hide caption

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Courtesy of Providence

LA's Top Restaurant Charts New Waters In Sustainable Seafood

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A traditional fisherman in La Paz, Mexico, who works with SmartFish brings sustainable seafood to market. SmartFish was one of the competitors in last week's Fish 2.0 competition. Courtesy of Smart Fish hide caption

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Courtesy of Smart Fish

Juvenile Chinook salmon swim in the American River in California. The state's salmon fishery, which revolves around fall-run Chinook, has been estimated to be worth $1.4 billion, with the fish finding their way into markets and restaurants. Courtesy of John Hannon/USBR hide caption

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Courtesy of John Hannon/USBR

Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

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Parisi Tsakirios, 29, mends a net as he prepares for another fishing trip. "I can't imagine doing any other job, because I love the sea," he says. "But there are hardly any fish. I barely break even. I can't support my family." Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

As Fish Stocks Dwindle, So Do The Livelihoods Of Greek Fishermen

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Pacific bluefin tuna for sale for $2.99 per pound at the fish market in San Diego. That shockingly low price does not reflect the deeply threatened state of the bluefin population. Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR hide caption

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Clare Leschin-Hoar for NPR

Pacific Halibut caught in Cook's Inlet, Alaska. via Wikimedia hide caption

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via Wikimedia

Halibut Dumping Stirs Fight Among Fishing Fleets In Alaska

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Fish for sale in the fish market in Fraserburgh, Scotland. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Cod Comeback: How The North Sea Fishery Bounced Back From The Brink

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