The Temple of Bel in Palmyra had already sustained some damage from artillery shells in March 2014, when these columns in the temple courtyard were photographed. The ancient temple stood at a cultural crossroads, showing influences from Greco-Roman and Persian traditions, and was one of Syria's most famous archaeological sites. It was destroyed late in August of 2015. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As ISIS Destroys Artifacts, Could Some Antiquities Have Been Saved?

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Neonta Williams (left) shares family letters dating back to 1901 with preservationist Kimberly Peach during the Smithsonian's Save our African American Treasures program at the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Peach advises her to use archive-quality polyester sleeves to protect the fragile papers, rather than store them in a zip-lock bag. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Preserving Black History, Americans Care For National Treasures At Home

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