U.S. authorities are working on an emergency deal to import the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which is not currently licensed in the U.S. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

This illustration depicts a yellow fever victim in a Jefferson Street home in Memphis. It's from a series of images entitled "The Great Yellow Fever Scourge — Incidents Of Its Horrors In The Most Fatal District Of The Southern States." Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

The Angolan military administers yellow fever vaccines at a market in Luanda, the capital city. Joost De Raeymaeker/EPA/Corbis hide caption

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Joost De Raeymaeker/EPA/Corbis

A 'Forgotten Disease' Is Suddenly Causing New Worries

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Mmm. Smells just like your identical twin. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Why Do Mosquitoes Like To Bite You Best? It's In Your Genes

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In this colored transmission electron micrograph, an infected cell (reddish brown) releases a single Ebola virus (the blue hook). As it exits, the virus takes along part of the host cell's membrane (pink, center), too. That deters the host's immune defenses from recognizing the virus as foreign. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine/Science Source hide caption

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London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine/Science Source

Ebola Drug Could Be Ready For Human Testing Next Year

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